"Man surprised me most about humanity. Because he sacrifices his health in order to make money. Then he sacrifices money to recuperate his health. And then he is so anxious about the future that he does not enjoy the present; the result being that he does not live in the present or the future; he lives as if he is never going to die, and then dies having never really lived."

 ~Dalai Lama (via theangrytherapist)

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(Source: best-of-memes, via jkilina)

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(Source: honehhboii, via jkilina)

287,070 notes

littlelimpstiff14u2:

quilace:

Real windows framed as T.V screens (Project), 2014 Ibon Mainar

Just had to re blog again !

littlelimpstiff14u2:

quilace:

Real windows framed as T.V screens (Project), 2014 Ibon Mainar

Just had to re blog again !

(Source: mainart, via veggieomnom)

145,303 notes

(Source: everybodylovejessica, via darylelockhart)

341,903 notes

Why Ordinary People Need to Understand Power

Its a very interesting view on the motivations of change. Unfortunately, I think its only true in some given circumstances. Alot of it may be irrelevant in certain places, like China, for example, where such ‘Power’ for influence is immediately quashed by the government.

Its a very interesting talk nonetheless…

reimaginate:

pbh3:

The planets, aligned.

(Source: jonyorkblog, via jkilina)

551,681 notes

A Princess of Mars by Edgar Burroughs

This book was surprisingly available in public domain via the Gutenberg Project, so I just picked it up there. This is also one of the recommendations for an AskReddit thread about good books to read.

John Carter is a former Confederate officer that discovers a gold vein. As he searches for his partner, he finds that his partner has been killed by Indians and in the process, angers the Indians themselves. He hides in a cave and finds himself astrally projected to Barsoom, a war-torn and desolate Mars inhabited by seemingly humanoid beings that are separated, by lineage and tradition, into tribes.

A Princess of Mars is the first of a series of books by Burroughs, detailing the adventures and account of his ‘Uncle Jack’. The plot of the book is a typical hero, trial-and-tribulation, damsel-in-distress adventure book. Carter is practically super-human in Mars because of its different gravitational force. He ends up becoming a warlord in Mars and marrying a princess (thus the name).

There really isn’t much to reflect on it, honestly. It was a fun, quick read but it was a bit too linear. You could almost tell what was going to happen by the end of the book when you’re finished nearly 10% of it. John Carter doesn’t seem to grow in character at all. He’s just this super-human force and the civilizations of Mars revolve around his appearance. It wasn’t like Ray Bradbury’s the Martian Chronicles, where it left you trembling in loneliness or pity. It can’t even compare to Vonnegut’s Sirens of Titan, where Vonnegut imbues entire philosophies in single paragraphs. Burroughs’ Princess of Mars was simply a passing fiction book that is appropriate for grade-school level.

Oddly, many authors, philosophers, astronomists, etc have stated A Prince of Mars as one of their inspirational books.

The Barsoom series inspired a number of well-known 20th century science fiction writers, including Jack Vance, Ray Bradbury, Arthur C. Clarke, Robert A. Heinlein, and John Norman. The series was also inspirational for many scientists in the fields of space exploration and the search for extraterrestrial life, including Carl Sagan, who read A Princess of Mars when he was a child. - Wikipedia

divmond-tits:

unamusedsloth:

If alcohol labels told the truth.

this

(via jkilina)

96,670 notes

How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie

BECOME A FRIENDLIER PERSON

  • Don’t criticize, condemn or complain.
  • Give honest and sincere appreciation.
  • Arouse in the other person an eager want.
  • Become genuinely interested in other people.
  • Smile.
  • Remember that a persons name is to that person the sweetest and most important sound in any language.
  • Be a good listener. Encourage others to talk about themselves.
  • Talk in terms of the other person’s interests.
  • Make the other person feel important, and do it sincerely.
  • The only way to get the best of an argument is to avoid it.

________________________________________
WIN PEOPLE TO YOUR WAY OF THINKING

  • Show respect for the other person’s opinions. Never say, “You are Wrong.”
  • If you are wrong, admit it quickly and emphatically.
  • Begin in a friendly way.
  • Get the other person saying “yes, yes” immediately.
  • Let the other person do a great deal of the talking.
  • Let the other person feel that the idea is his or hers.
  • Try honestly to see things from the other person’s point of view.
  • Be sympathetic with the other person’s ideas and desires.
  • Appeal to the nobler motives.
  • Dramatize your ideas.

________________________________________
BE A LEADER

  • Throw down a challenge.
  • Begin with praise and honest appreciation
  • Call attention to people’s mistakes indirectly
  • Talk about your own mistakes before criticizing the other person
  • Ask questions instead of giving direct orders
  • Let the other person save face
  • Praise the slightest improvement and praise every improvement. Be “Hearty in your approbation and lavish in your praise.”
  • Give the other person a fine reputation to live up to.
  • Use encouragement. Make the fault seem easy to correct.
  • Make the other person happy about doing the thing you suggest.

A Summary…

2 notes

Sirens of Titan by Kurt Vonnegut

This was a lot better than SlaughterHouse-Five, perhaps because it didn’t jump back and forth chronologically. I also got a lot out of the text too, though its hard to describe it completely. Vonnegut touches on themes of Omniscience and Freewill in very comical terms. It was such an interesting read because of how absolutely ridiculous some of scenes were. But in an odd way, he gave each scene and section a very ‘human’ touch so while it was ludicrous, it was also extremely believable.


It was just a bit hard to actually get into the book. After the first chapter or two, it really picks up. I nearly gave up on this book but knowing Vonnegut’s reputation for good books, I powered through and was not disappointed. I find that this was also true for Cat’s Cradle and Slaughter-House Five. The background takes a while to construct but good books will always need that time in the beginning I guess. It makes me wonder if I should try and give the other books that I gave up a second chance again.

There’s so many different themes in Sirens that its hard to pick out one in particular. A cool one was the unity of the human race when the ‘Martians’ invaded. Suddenly all of the humans banded together against a common enemy. It’s the type of thing that the Watchmen pulled off but Vonnegut used such a ridiculous plot to set it up that it was considerable more entertaining. He also explores luck, and how Malachi Constant and his billionaire fortune from his father was entirely based off of the Bible’s random letters.

Vonnegut’s depiction of omniscience and freewill was most powerful part of the book.

"Look," said Rumfoord, "life for a punctual person is like a roller coaster." He turned to shiver his hands in her face. "All kinds of things are going to happen to you! Sure," he said, "I can see the whole roller coaster you’re on. And sure — I could give you a piece of paper that would tell you about every dip and turn, warn you about every bogeyman that was going to pop out at you in the tunnels. But that wouldn’t help you any."

"I don’t see why not," said Beatrice.

"Because you’d still have to take the roller-coaster ride," said Rumford. "I didn’t design the roller coaster, I don’t own it, and I don’t say who rides and who doesn’t. I just know what it’s shaped like."

Reminds me of the Matrix actually. Everything that’s supposed to happen in the Matrix is, and always will happen. In fact, everyone knows this. But the reason why they still have to go through it is to understand why they made those certain decisions. Even the omniscient Winston Niles Rumfoord was a just a simply pawn and part to accomplish a trivial task. There is no ‘greater good’ or ‘ultimate role’ that anyone is filling. In the end, everything could just be a funny joke, a project that someone or something is playing.

I felt empty at the end of the book – like there was no meaning to life but a silly explanation. What the hell are people doing all the things that they do for? No purpose….

darylelockhart:

Every. Taboo Social Topic. Ever.

(Source: monodoh)

325,515 notes

Foundations of Typography by Ina Saltz

3 courses- Foundations, Color-Contrast-&-Scale, Hierarchy-and-Navigation

Lynda.com apparently has a wide range of technical courses that people can buy and take. This was my first few Lynda.com courses and it was not disappointing. Granted, typography is as much a science as it an art so experience is perhaps the most important factor in getting good at it. The course was still pretty good and went into the nitty-gritty of what makes good and bad typography. There were also plenty of visual examples as well.

Ina Saltz is a Professor at CCNY. She teaches this seminar based course and I have to say that its done quite well. All the movie file clips are organized very well, each few minutes and sections focusing on one specific part. The information is also fairly recent, with pictures of the new Cooper Union building. The best part about this course is the analysis of specific examples, like modern packaging type, signage, etc. There’s depth as well as breadth in terms of the quality of examples and analysis.

The only gripe about this is that there is too much ‘teaching’ and less interaction. While most of the Lynda.com courses have course exercises, the first Foundations course, and also the most robust of the three, did not have these courses. Even for the other two, the exercises weren’t very rigorous. I wish there were more examples laid next to each other that asked the viewers ‘can you spot the difference?’ or ‘what is wrong with these two types?’ – then go into detail about the analysis. Slowly building up smaller exercises lets the reader digest information better. Later, a larger cumulative exercise makes it more of milestone for the viewer to feel progress.

At the end of the first Foundations course, which was nearly three times longer than the other two courses combined, there were a number of tips that Saltz listed for basic font and type uses. I wish there was a comprehensive list of those and all the ones she had in the other two courses as well. Ideally, people paying money should have access to the ‘summary’ and shortcuts but I guess making them go through all the videos to find them holds them more accountable. One of these days I think I’ll post them up here.

Its comparable to Matthew Butterick’s Book on Typography though the colors and changing visuals make the videos a bit more interesting to follow. That said, Butterick’s Book is based on pure appreciation for type and typography. I do appreciate his approach to providing the most impactful, simple changes in the beginning of the book though.

michiamocristina:
An 87 Year Old College Student Named Rose The first day of school our professor introduced himself and challenged us to get to know someone we didn’t already know. I stood up to look around when a gentle hand touched my shoulder. I turned round to find a wrinkled, little old lady beaming up at me with a smile that lit up her entire being. She said, “Hi handsome. My name is Rose. I’m eighty-seven years old. Can I give you a hug?” I laughed and enthusiastically responded, “Of course you may!” and she gave me a giant squeeze. “Why are you in college at such a young, innocent age?” I asked. She jokingly replied, “I’m here to meet a rich husband, get married, and have a couple of kids…” “No seriously,” I asked. I was curious what may have motivated her to be taking on this challenge at her age. “I always dreamed of having a college education and now I’m getting one!” she told me. After class we walked to the student union building and shared a chocolate milkshake.We became instant friends. Every day for the next three months, we would leave class together and talk nonstop. I was always mesmerized listening to this “time machine” as she shared her wisdom and experience with me. Over the course of the year, Rose became a campus icon and she easily made friends wherever she went. She loved to dress up and she reveled in the attention bestowed upon her from the other students. She was living it up. At the end of the semester we invited Rose to speak at our football banquet. I’ll never forget what she taught us. She was introduced and stepped up to the podium. As she began to deliver her prepared speech, she dropped her three by five cards on the floor. Frustrated and a little embarrassed she leaned into the microphone and simply said, “I’m sorry I’m so jittery. I gave up beer for Lent and this whiskey is killing me! I’ll never get my speech back in order so let me just tell you what I know.” As we laughed she cleared her throat and began, “We do not stop playing because we are old; we grow old because we stop playing. There are only four secrets to staying young, being happy, and achieving success. You have to laugh and find humor every day. You’ve got to have a dream. When you lose your dreams, you die. We have so many people walking around who are dead and don’t even know it!There is a huge difference between growing older and growing up. If you are nineteen years old and lie in bed for one full year and don’t do one productive thing, you will turn twenty years old. If I am eighty-seven years old and stay in bed for a year and never do anything I will turn eighty-eight. Anybody can grow older. That doesn’t take any talent or ability. The idea is to grow up by always finding opportunity in change. Have no regrets. The elderly usually don’t have regrets for what we did, but rather for things we did not do. The only people who fear death are those with regrets.” She concluded her speech by courageously singing “The Rose.” She challenged each of us to study the lyrics and live them out in our daily lives. At the year’s end Rose finished the college degree she had begun all those years ago. One week after graduation Rose died peacefully in her sleep. Over two thousand college students attended her funeral in tribute to the wonderful woman who taught by example that it’s never too late to be all you can possibly be .When you finish reading this, please send this peaceful word of advice to your friends and family, they’ll really enjoy it! These words have been passed along in loving memory of ROSE. REMEMBER, GROWING OLDER IS MANDATORY. GROWING UP IS OPTIONAL. We make a Living by what we get, We make a Life by what we give. Note: Picture is NOLA OCHS, Guinness World Record Holder as the World’s Oldest College Graduate - an example of the story.

michiamocristina:

An 87 Year Old College Student Named Rose

The first day of school our professor introduced himself and challenged us to get to know someone we didn’t already know. I stood up to look around when a gentle hand touched my shoulder. I turned round to find a wrinkled, little old lady beaming up at me with a smile that lit up her entire being. She said, “Hi handsome. My name is Rose. I’m eighty-seven years old. Can I give you a hug?”

I laughed and enthusiastically responded, “Of course you may!” and she gave me a giant squeeze.

“Why are you in college at such a young, innocent age?” I asked. She jokingly replied, “I’m here to meet a rich husband, get married, and have a couple of kids…” “No seriously,” I asked. I was curious what may have motivated her to be taking on this challenge at her age. “I always dreamed of having a college education and now I’m getting one!” she told me.

After class we walked to the student union building and shared a chocolate milkshake.We became instant friends. Every day for the next three months, we would leave class together and talk nonstop. I was always mesmerized listening to this “time machine” as she shared her wisdom and experience with me.

Over the course of the year, Rose became a campus icon and she easily made friends wherever she went. She loved to dress up and she reveled in the attention bestowed upon her from the other students. She was living it up.

At the end of the semester we invited Rose to speak at our football banquet. I’ll never forget what she taught us. She was introduced and stepped up to the podium. As she began to deliver her prepared speech, she dropped her three by five cards on the floor. Frustrated and a little embarrassed she leaned into the microphone and simply said, “I’m sorry I’m so jittery. I gave up beer for Lent and this whiskey is killing me! I’ll never get my speech back in order so let me just tell you what I know.” As we laughed she cleared her throat and began, “We do not stop playing because we are old; we grow old because we stop playing. There are only four secrets to staying young, being happy, and achieving success. You have to laugh and find humor every day. You’ve got to have a dream. When you lose your dreams, you die. We have so many people walking around who are dead and don’t even know it!There is a huge difference between growing older and growing up. If you are nineteen years old and lie in bed for one full year and don’t do one productive thing, you will turn twenty years old. If I am eighty-seven years old and stay in bed for a year and never do anything I will turn eighty-eight. Anybody can grow older. That doesn’t take any talent or ability. The idea is to grow up by always finding opportunity in change. Have no regrets. The elderly usually don’t have regrets for what we did, but rather for things we did not do. The only people who fear death are those with regrets.” She concluded her speech by courageously singing “The Rose.” She challenged each of us to study the lyrics and live them out in our daily lives.

At the year’s end Rose finished the college degree she had begun all those years ago. One week after graduation Rose died peacefully in her sleep. Over two thousand college students attended her funeral in tribute to the wonderful woman who taught by example that it’s never too late to be all you can possibly be .

When you finish reading this, please send this peaceful word of advice to your friends and family, they’ll really enjoy it! These words have been passed along in loving memory of ROSE.

REMEMBER, GROWING OLDER IS MANDATORY. GROWING UP IS OPTIONAL.

We make a Living by what we get, We make a Life by what we give.

Note: Picture is NOLA OCHS, Guinness World Record Holder as the World’s Oldest College Graduate - an example of the story.

584,702 notes

fastcompany:

Some Hero Made The Entire “Simpsons” Town of Springfield Out Of Lego

As The Simpsons begins its marathon on FXX and Lego continues its renaissance year, a big fan combined his passions into a Lego Springfield.

See More>

343 notes